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Pain Specialists of Orange County
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Pain Conditions

Listed below are common pain conditions and pain syndromes treated at the Pain Specialists of Orange County medical facilities in Orange County.
Call us with any questions you have regarding your pain condition, treatment or pain management: (949) 297-3838Orange County pain management. View Pain Management and Pain Treatment Videos on our Home page.

Providing help for Back pain in Orange County, we are specialists in medical conditions that treat back pain problem. We offer services for neck pain in Orange County. Both back pain conditions and neck pain condition are listed and described below.


Back Pain

Back pain is an extremely common problem affecting millions each year. A wide variety of issues can lead to back pain originating from the muscles, bones, joints or nerves. Although it does occur most commonly in the low back the pain can be anywhere from the neck to the pelvis. Certain associated symptoms such as weakness, fever, or bowel/bladder control problems might require additional workup. Your pain physician in these instances will order more advanced imaging (MRI/CT scan) and surgical evaluation if indicated. Read more about Back Pain

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Cancer Pain

The optimal management of cancer pain continues to be a challenge throughout the world despite nearly two decades of emphasis on the need for more aggressive and effective treatments. The clinician’s problem is first to find the cause of the pain and then to initiate individualized treatments. Critical to this process is the analysis, by objective measures, of the outcomes of therapies with the ultimate goal of patient comfort.

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Coccydynia (Tailbone Pain)

Coccydynia is a painful condition characterized by pain over the tailbone area particularly increased with pressure over the area. Patients with coccydynia will report significant pain with sitting. It can be related to trauma, degeneration, childbirth, and prolonged sitting with pressure on the tailbone. At times however the pain can appear with no identifiable cause. Read more about Coccydynia (Tailbone Pain)

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Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (RSD)

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain syndrome with two forms. CRPS 1 currently replaces the term "reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome". It is a chronic nerve disorder that occurs most often in the arms or legs after a minor or major injury.

CRPS 1 is associated with severe pain; changes in the nails, bone, and skin; and an increased sensitivity to touch in the affected limb. CRPS 2 replaces the term causalgia, and results from an identified injury to the nerve. Read more about Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (RSD)

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Degenerative Disc Disease

Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is a gradual process that may compromise the spine. Although DDD is relatively common, its effects are usually not severe enough to warrant medical attention unless it begins to cause back pain. Degenerated discs may also be prone to disc herniation. As the thickness of a disc decreases during the degenerative process, exiting nerve roots may become compromised which could lead to sciatic type pain.

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Diabetic Neuropathy

Of the 16 million Americans with diabetes, 25% develop foot related problems related to the disease. This is primarily due to a condition called neuropathy. Diabetic Neuropathy is a complication of diabetes that affects the nerves and with proper pain treatment, pain management can be achieved. The most common type of diabetic neuropathy is called peripheral neuropathy and affects the peripheral nerves. Peripheral nerves are the nerves that go out from the brain and spinal cord to the muscles, skin, internal organs, and glands. Peripheral neuropathy impairs proper functioning of these sensory and motor nerves. The most common symptoms of neuropathy include numbness and loss of feeling, usually in the feet and hands. Read more about Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

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Disc Herniation

Each vertebral disc is composed of a tough outer layer of cartilage and a more elastic central area. As we age, these discs degenerate and become thinner and weaker. Extra pressure from a fall or from heavy lifting can cause cracks in the outer layers of the discs, allowing the central mass to squeeze out. This kind of rupture can put pressure on the spinal cord or the nerves that branch from it. Herniated discs in the lumbar or sacral regions can put pressure on the sciatic nerve causing pain and discomfort.

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Facet Syndrome

Facet joints are small joints, which attach adjacent vertebral bodies together and help with range of motion of the spine in the neck and back. Like any joint they have a fluid in them called synovial fluid. With Chronic pressure, degeneration or trauma, arthritis may develop in these joints, which can be a source of back pain.

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Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

Failed back surgery syndrome, also known as postlaminectomy syndrome, refers to patients that undergo back surgery and still experience chronic pain. It can result from any type of back surgery and refers to patients with increase pain, new pain, and even patients who have less pain than prior to surgery. Read more about Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

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Fibromyalgia

According to the diagnostic criteria for Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) published by the 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

Fibromyalgia patients must have:
Widespread pain in all four quadrants of their body for a minimum of three months. At least 11 of the 18 specific tender points.

Although the above criteria, created for research purposes, focuses on tender point count, a recent consensus of 35 FMS experts has determined that a person does not need to have the required 11 tender points to be diagnosed and treated for FMS.

Many people who have less than 11 of the required tender points may still be diagnosed with FMS as long as they have widespread pain and many of the common symptoms associated with FMS.

Commonly associated symptoms include:

  • Fatigue
  • Sleep disorder (or sleep that is unrefreshing)
  • Jaw pain (TMJ dysfunction)
  • Post-exertion malaise and muscle pain
  • Numbness and tingling
  • Skin sensitivities
  • Morning stiffness
  • Irritable bowel
  • Chronic headaches (tension type or migraines)
  • Cognitive or memory impairment
  • Menstrual cramping and PMS
  • Dizziness or impaired coordination

Read more about Fibromyalgia

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Headaches

Headaches are categorized as a primary headache (tension, migraine, cluster, etc.) or secondary to an underlying cause. Secondary headaches are less prevalent. Primary headaches are treated symptomatically to bring relief and prevent recurrence. Secondary headaches are approached with the goal of treating the underlying cause. Read more about Headaches

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Myofascial Pain Syndrome

Myofascial Pain Syndrome may be related to work when the identified active trigger point is present in the region injured in a direct traumatic incident or repetitive muscular strain and where there is continuous medical evidence and reporting.

Myofascial Pain Syndrome has been associated with a variety of factors which can occur at work or during leisure activities. Development of active trigger points can be associated with mechanical, physical, and psychological stressors, as well as socioeconomic factors. 23 Mechanical and physical stressors such as over-stretching, and direct trauma, are of sudden onset. Gradual onset follows overuse, repetitive strain or abnormal assumed postures. Psychological stressors include depression, tension from anxiety and secondary gain.

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Occipital Neuralgia

Occipital Neuralgia is pain located in the cervical (neck) and posterior (back) regions of the head (these are the occipital areas). This pain may or may not extend or radiate into the sides of the head ultimately, into the facial and frontal regions. Occipital neuralgia is really two separate disorders with similar symptoms: lesser occipital nerve neuralgia and greater occipital neuralgia. This disorder often occurs after a whiplash injury, a blow to the back of the head, or an injury that produces a twisting of the head. Read more about Occipital Neuralgia

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Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of joint disease and is normally caused by wear and tear of the joints as a result of aging. This condition generally involves degradation of the bone and cartilage of joints. It is most commonly in the hand, knee, hip and spinal joints. The level of pain may vary with each patient based on the amount of activity throughout one's life. Read more about Osteoarthritis

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Phantom Limb Pain

Phantom limb was first described in 1551 by a French military surgeon named Ambrose Pare. The term "phantom limb" was coined by a civil war surgeon named Silas Weir Mitchell.

Patients who have had a body part amputated will sometimes have the feeling that their body part is still present. This "phantom limb" sensation is present in almost all patients after amputation. In many of these patients this sensation can be painful and debilitating. Read more about Phantom Limb Pain

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Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)

What is Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)?

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is composed of plasma with a high concentration of  platelets containing growth factors.  A normal platelet count is 150,000-350,000 while PRP contains 3-6 times that number and sometimes more. Read more about Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP).

Post-Mastectomy

A mastectomy is the surgical removal of the entire breast, usually to treat serious breast disease, such as breast cancer. Spinal Pain Specialists offer numerous treatment programs to aid in the pain management of this procedure.

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Post Herpetic Neuralgia

Shingles, or herpes zoster, is caused by the chickenpox virus that remains in the nerve roots of all persons who had chickenpox and can come out in your body again years later to cause illness.

Shingles is more common after the age of 50 and the risk increases with advancing age. Shingles causes numbness, itching or severe pain followed by clusters of blister-like lesions in a strip-like pattern on one side of your body. The pain can persist for weeks, months or years after the rash heals and is then known as post-herpetic neuralgia.

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Postherpetic Neuralgia

Most people get chickenpox as a child, and the virus that causes this remains, but becomes dormant afterwards. Shingles is a result of reactivation of this latent varicella zoster virus. The incidence of this increases significantly with age. The infection affects a nerve and the skin surrounding it, and usually lasts for a few weeks. Post herpetic neuralgia is generally defined as a pain that persists at least three months after the acute shingles rash heals. Read more about Postherpetic Neuralgia

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Sacroiliac Joint Pain

The sacroiliac (SI) joint is a strong, weight bearing synovial joint between the ilium and sacrum bones of the pelvis. The bones are held in place and allowed limited movements by a system of sacroiliac ligaments. Relaxation of this and other joints and ligaments is important during pregnancy. Like any other joint, the SI joint can develop inflammation by trauma or chronic asymmetric pressure on the joint. Pain from the SI joint can be in the low back/buttock area and may radiate into the legs as well. Read more about Sacroiliac Joint Pain

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Sciatica

The term "sciatica" is commonly used to describe pain traveling in the distribution of the sciatic nerve. Sciatica is a symptom caused by compression of one of the nerve roots that make up the sciatic nerve. This compression is often caused by a lumbar disc herniation or bulge, which may put pressure or even displace the nerve root. Read more about Sciatica

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Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis is defined as a narrowing of the spinal canal. This can result in pain due to impingement of the spinal cord and associated nerves. The pain of spinal stenosis is generally experienced in the low back and legs. Many will report cramping or weakness in their legs with prolonged walking or standing. The risk for spinal stenosis increases with advancing age. Read more about Spinal Stenosis 

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Spondylolisthesis

Degenerative changes in the spine are often referred to those that cause the loss of normal structure and/or function. Degenerative Spondylolisthesis (DS) is a disorder that causes the forward motion (slip) of one vertebral body over the one below. The term Spondylolisthesis is formed from two Greek words; spondylo meaning vertebra and olisthesis meaning to slide on an incline. DS is most common in the lumbar spine (L4-L5) and may cause low back pain.

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Vertebral Compression Fracture

Vertebral compression fractures are common and can be very serious and painful. A vertebral compression fracture generally causes significant pain along the fracture site and is more common as bone density decreases (osteoporosis). A vertebral compression fractures is when a bone located in the spine collapses usually due to an excess of pressure, a hard fall, or any other type of physical injury. In patients with severe osteoporosis, even coughing may cause the fracture. At times however patients cannot recall any clear trauma or incident leading to the fracture. Read more about Vertebral Compression Fracture 

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Contact the Pain Specialists of Orange County with your questions about pain conditions, pain management and treatments. Call: (949) 297-3838. Visit related pages regarding pain treatment, management, conditions and our Orange County facilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTICE TO CONSUMERS

Office Locations
Laguna Hills
24953 Paseo de Valencia
Building A, Suite 5A
Laguna Hills
CA 92653
More information
Tel: (949) 297-3838
Fax: (949) 855-7590
Mission Viejo
25982 Pala
Suite 280
Mission Viejo
CA 92691
More information
Tel: (949) 297-3838
Fax: (949) 297-3839
Irvine
35 Creek Road
Irvine
CA 92604
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Tel: (949) 297-3838
Fax: (949) 679-1084

Fountain Valley
10221 Slater Ave.
Suite 114
Fountain Valley
CA 92708
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Tel: (949) 297-3838
Fax: (949) 679-1084

San Clemente
647 Camino de Los Mares
Suite 223
San Clemente
CA 92673
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Tel: (949) 297-3838
Fax: (949) 297-3839

Orange
1310 W. Stewart Dr.  
Suite 608
Orange
CA 92868
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Tel: (949) 297-3838
Fax: (949) 679-1084
 

 

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